Welcome!

BCCAN is an active environment group based in the central west of New South Wales, Australia. We invite you to take a "stroll" through our site to find out more about us.

Rising Sea Levels and Ocean Pollution

By Laurana Smith

Steb Fisher to be guest speaker at BCCAN AGM

Steb Fisher

Bathurst Community Climate Action Network (BCCAN) is pleased to announce the guest speaker at its upcoming Annual General Meeting, to be held at 6pm on Tuesday, October 18 in the Courtyard Room at the Bathurst RSL.

BCCAN Newsletter 32 August 2016

BCCAN's 32nd Newsletter, edited by Publicity Officer Laurana Smith.

NASA knows its stuff

OTC site, Carnarvon WA.

By Tracy Sorensen

The Great 21st Century Energy Challenge

Poster
BCCAN members, supporters and the wider community may be interested to attend a seminar on energy futures given by Dr Matthew Ives, research scientist at the University of Oxford, and his father Mike Ives, an expert in energy infrastructure.
 

Farewell, sounds of silence

By Tracy Sorensen

Last Saturday I watched as a group of residents from Napoleon Reef tied strips of red, white, blue, black and yellow fabric to old gum trees. It was an exquisite sunny winter day that brought out the colours lifting in the gentle breeze.

Rare white wallaroo of Mt Pan dies

The following is a media release sent to BCCAN on Friday 5/8/16. The white wallaroos of Mt Panorama were a feature of our 2015 "200 Plants and Animals" exhibition. Pic is a mounted photograph by Tim Bergen as it appeared in the exhibition. 

Wild storms give a picture of the future

By Tracey Carpenter

BCCAN is part of a nationwide network of people engaged on the frontline of climate impacts and the push for action to make our communities safe from extreme weather.

Mid north coast climate action group, CCA, president Harry Creamer had this to say about the horrifying east coast storms this week.

Successful farming and biodiversity go together

Farmers and environmentalists were once seen as sitting on opposite sides of the barbed wire fence, but that is rapidly changing.

The campaign against coal seam gas, or fracking, has seen so called “greenies” and farmers sitting side by side at the barricades trying to hold off mining interests that would alienate prime agricultural land.

Chris Marshall's paper on the Bathurst landscape

Chris & Mary Marshall have now retired to the south coast. They will be sorely missed by environmentalists in Bathurst. You can read Chris's outstanding paper on the Bathurst landscape by downloading the PDF.

Setting a lower voltage example for energy savings

EFFICIENCY: Bob Hill (BCCAN), Peter Harris (CSU) and Grant Christopherson (OEH) with an electricity substation on the Bathurst CSU campus. Pic by John Merkel.

By Tracy Sorensen

Heavy metal band AC/DC celebrated high voltage rock n roll, but when it comes to the environment, too much voltage can be a bad thing.

July 2: The climate election

With the double-dissolution Federal election expected to take place on July 2, Bathurst Community Climate Action Network president Tracey Carpenter has called for all Calare candidates across the political spectrum to put climate change front and centre as an election issue.

With shocking new evidence of climate change occurring at an even faster rate than previously predicted, Ms Carpenter said this was an historic opportunity to make good the world's commitment to lowering greenhouse gas emissions.

Bathurst Kangaroo Project calls for volunteers for new research

The Bathurst Kangaroo Project has put out a call for volunteers to help with a new research project by Western Sydney University student researcher Hannah Rowland.

Nature Conservation Council releases climage change policy

The Nature Conservation Council of NSW (NCC) has released its climate change policy. It is reproduced below:

 

Nature Conservation Council of NSW Climate Change Policy*

PRINCIPLES

1.1 Climate change refers to long-lasting changes to world climate patterns such as average temperatures, rainfall and incidence of severe weather events. Changing weather patterns pose existential risks for human and natural systems.

Subscribe to Front page feed